The Panther Page

The Bikes: Heavyweights - Model 100

 

1932 Model 100 Redwing 

This was the first year of manufacture of the Model 100. A 598cc engine was used in the Model 85 Redwing (previously Model 80) from 1929 to 1930 and the Model 60 (previously Model 3) from 1928 to 1935. I believe that the Model 100 engine was a development from the Model 60. The earlier engines had compression ratios of either 5.4:1 (Model 60 pre-1930) or 7.0:1 (Model 85 and Model 60 post-1929). The frame apparently (see Barry Jones) derives from the 1928 Panther and the tank from the 1932 Model 50.

The 1932 Model 100 had a 598cc, 6.5:1 compression ratio, 87 x 100 mm, ohv sloper engine which replaced the front down tube of the frame. The Model 100 had BTH Magneto ignition and a P&M four-speed gearbox. Webb heavy duty forks provided front suspension. Wheels were 26" x 3.25" front and rear with 7" half width front hub and 8" Enfield hub rear. The brakes were linked. The P&M twin headlight system was fitted. For this first year the seat was a Lycett Aero sprung saddle.

I am grateful to Gijs Houweling for the pictures above and these detail pictures, showing a close up of the engine and the view from the seat. The machine is unrestored and completely original except for the silencers. The gearbox is (presumably) the P&M four speed unit.

1933 Model 100 Redwing 

Name - 100rw33.JPG, Source - Classic Bike / Ray Archer, Size - 113kThis is the 598cc Model 100 Redwing which cost £67 10s when new in 1933. This bike is not entirely standard having the later silencers, the panther head rather than leaping panther tank badge and a Burman rather than Strurmey Archer gearbox. It is a very well restored example and has some interesting features including the P&M patent dual headlight system and linked braking system. Other features include Webb single spring front forks and Lycett saddle. The engine delivered peak torque at 3500rpm and peak power at 5500rpm. The MotorCycle tester took the bike to 77mph in 1933. 1933 saw the introduction of the U-bolt cylinder barrel fastening.

Name - twinhead.gif, Source - Classic Bike, Size - 3kName - LnkBrake.JPG, Source - C.lassic Bike / Ray Archer, Size - 17kFrank Leach designed this patented dual headlight system where the cable operated system physically dips the left Miller unit whilst breaking a contact between the lights to extinguish the right unit thus avoiding dazzling oncoming traffic. This ingenius and simple optional extra cost an additional £10 10s (and looks like trouble to me). The front brake has two cables to realise a linked brake system where the foot brake applies both front and rear whilst the hand lever applies just the front brake. Despite this system (which has been seen in similar form on later bikes, especially Moto Guzzis) the brakes are apparently not confidence inspiring, presumably due to the puny 7" drums. 

I am grateful to  / Ray Archer for permission to reproduce these pictures from the excellent article in the March 1996 magazine.

1934 Model 100 Redwing 

Name - 100rw33.JPG, Source - Classic Bike / Ray Archer, Size - 113kThis was the third year of manufacture of the Model 100. The main change to the model for this year is that the four speed, foot-change Burman gearbox, which had been an option previously, became standard.

The 1934 Model 100 had a 598cc, 6.5:1 compression ratio, 87 x 100 mm, ohv sloper engine which replaced the front down tube of the frame, which had twin saddle tubes. The Model 100 had BTH Magneto ignition and a Burman 1BAP four speed foot-change gearbox. Webb heavy duty forks provided front suspension. Wheels were 26" x 3.25" front and rear with 7" half width front hub and 8" Enfield hub rear. The brakes were linked. The P&M twin headlight system was fitted.

The colour scheme for 1934 was black framewith green / cream tank.

1935 Model 100


1935 M100In 1935 the Model 100 saw some significant changes. The deeply finned sump and improved lubrication was introduced.  This new bottom end remained almost unchanged for the next twenty years..

The 1935 Model 100 had a 598cc, 6.5:1 compression ratio, 87 x 100 mm, ohv sloper engine. The Model 100 had BTH Magneto ignition and a Burman BAP four speed gearbox. Webb heavy duty forks provided front suspension. Wheels were 26" x 3.25" front and rear with 7" half width front hub and 8" Enfield hub rear. The brakes were linked.

The 1935 Model 100 was the machine on which Miss Florence Blenkiron and Miss Teresa Wallach undertook the epic journey from London to Cape Town, crossing the Sahara: the first such journey on a motorcycle combination.

The colour scheme for 1935 was black framewith green / cream or perhaps duo-tone green tank.

The machine in this photograph is (was in 1999) in the UK National Motorcycle Museum. Whilst labelled as 1935, the sump finning is not obvious.

1937 Model 100 

1937 M100

The 1937 Model 100 Panther motorcycle was the last year of the "Redwing" Model 100 and was in many respects similar to the previous two years' models with the 6.5:1 compression ratio, 87 x 100 mm, ohv sloper engine featuring the deeply finned sump and improved lubrication introduced in 1935. The gearbox was Burman BAP and the forks Webb heavy duty. The wheels were 19" x 3.25". The major change this year was the introduction of a fully chromed fuel tank with red and black lined cream forward panels and a new full colour snarling Panther's head logo.

I am grateful to David Noble for permission to use this picture of his father-in-law, Michael (Brian) Stubbs, during his war service (in NSW, Australia). 

1938 Model 100 Deluxe

Name - 10038s.JPG, Source - S.C.Fleming, Size - 42kName - 10038s.JPG, Source - S.C.Fleming, Size - 52kIn many respects a similar bike to the above, this is a fine unrestored example of a Model 100 Deluxe. Clearly visible is the dual headlamp setup. Less clear (in fact maybe invisible on these scanned photos) is the linked brake system. 1938 saw some evolutionary changes including a new cylinder head and the introduction of the kidney shaped rocker cover and a new timing cover which features the redwing motif previously on the rocker cover. 

The sidecar on this bike is Australian made and a bit of a mystery. 

I am grateful to John Ferguson for the opportunity to photograph (and ride) his bike. There are more photos of the bike in action and me having fun on it on the pictures page.

1946 Model 100 Redwing

Name - 100rdwng.JPG, Source - M.Duckett, Size - 133kThis is early Model 100 is clearly developed from the earlier heavyweights but is the start of this model which survived for nearly twenty years. This version has a 598cc OHV engine, a four speed gearbox and is equipped with girder front forks and no rear suspension. 

Technical Data 

I am grateful to Malcolm Duckett for providing the picture and technical data (from the Panther Instruction Booklet).

1949 Model 100 

Name: 100dowty.jpg, Source: Malcolm Duckett, Size: 101kThis true classic is, to my mind, probably the most attractive of the Panther models. This is an early form of the Model 100, the motorcycle for which Panther are probably most well known. This early model features a rigid rear end with Dowty Oleomatic, air sprung, oil damped, front suspension. The two exhausts from the twin port head are visible. 

Technical Data

I am grateful to Malcolm Duckett for providing the picture and technical data (from the Panther Instruction Booklet).

1951-53 Model 100 


This is a 1951 advert for the Model 100. The Book gives this tank paint scheme (chromed with cream panel) for 1946-51 and that below (grey metallic with 3" cream band) from 1951-53.

{I am grateful to Tom Norman for providing this picture}

Name: m100r.jpg, Source: Tom Norman, Size: 53kLittle has changed (as far as I can tell!) other than the paint scheme on the tank. I understand that the Lucas Magdyno (combined Magneto and Dynamo) had by now replaced the separate units. 

I am grateful to Tom Norman for providing the photograph (on the left) of his bike. The photograph on the right is of a machine in the UK National Motorcycle Museum  (I failed to adequately record the details - can anyone help?)

Model 100

Name - PANTHER12.JPG, Source - S.C.Fleming, Size - 224kAnd this is a rather fetching picture of a rather more modern (post 1958?) Model 100 (Model 120?) 

Technical Data

This photograph was taken at the POC Aysgarth camping weekend on 15/07/89 and is I believe of John Shaw's Model 100.

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